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Artwork in Kaluga

Employee Andrey Kudeneko has produced an extra-special Tiguan.

The new Tiguan that stands in the communications zone of the ­Kaluga plant looks remarkably real from a distance. Only on closer inspection do you realize that the vehicle is not made of the usual steel, aluminum, and synthetic materials, but instead out of cardboard, foamed plastic, wooden pallets, and construction foam. The car – or rather, the piece of ­ art – is the work of Andrey Kudeneko (48). He’s a full-time employee in the quality ­assurance department at the Russian site. In his free time, he makes models of ­various objects.

In 2015, Kudeneko made two pieces out of cardboard for the plant’s Christmas party. The event had been themed as a “Cosmic New Year,” and Kudenko made a rocket measuring 2.2 by 1.2 meters, and a copy of the WALL-E robot from the movie of the same name. With an eye on the upcoming launch of the new Tiguan, the plant’s management team and Kudeneko then came up with an idea. Kudeneko was to make a model of a Tiguan – a life-size one.

Andrey Kudeneko built the model car, and Julia Stukalo and Vladimir Isaev painted it.

» I’d like to thank colleagues who helped me with tips and practical support. «

He spent three months on this piece of art: in the evenings, on the weekends, and when the plant was closed for vacation. The only tools thaat he used were a handsaw, a box cutter, and a tape measure. His colleagues from the paint shop, Julia Stukalo and Vladimir Isaev, then made sure that the finished body of the Tiguan, which had been completely white, received a real paint job and markings. The SUV was given headlights, bumpers, wheels, hubs, door handles, and of course the Volkswagen logo.

This artwork was finally finished right on time for the launch of production of the real Tiguan. It was showcased for the first time at the plant’s Christmas party, covered with photos of members of the production staff. “Everyone was delighted with it,” reports Kudeneko with pride. “Many of my colleagues even took photos of the car.”